Simulation


  • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

    Simulation Tip: Animating Transient Results in SOLIDWORKS Flow 2017

    by David Roccaforte on March 3, 2017

    Today, I was running a SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation (CFD/Computational Fluid Dynamics) model of a blow mold tool. The goal of the analysis is to compare cooling line effects on tool surface temperatures.

    Simulation-Tip-Animating-Transient-Results-in-SOLIDWORKS-Flow-2017-1Molding is a transient process and XY plots are important but it’s very useful to see heat migration through the parts via animation. This is one of the big values of design validation. We can visualize phenomena that are difficult to see or measure physically.

    In the process, I was using a new SOLIDWORKS tool for animating surface plots and cut plots. It made my life so much easier that I had to stop working and started writing this blog.

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    • POSTED IN CAD, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

      How to Design a Filtration Unit with SOLIDWORKS and solidThinking

      by Drew Buchanan on February 22, 2017

      Recently, as I was drinking a cup of tea, I appreciated having hot and clean water to drink. I thought about the process of obtaining that water. Specifically, about the filtration process. I wondered, what if I could simulate the filtration process within SOLIDWORKS? I quickly realized that I could do more than simulate the filtration process. I could simulate the casting of individual parts as well as the injection molding of specific parts of the apparatus.

      With that understanding, I set forth to utilize SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation, SOLIDWORKS Plastics, and solidThinking’s Click2Cast to optimize the design. In this blog, I will lay out the steps to analyze a filtration unit with three different simulation and analysis solutions. I will also be hosting a webcast regarding everything we talked about in this blog.

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      • POSTED IN SIMULATION

        solidThinking: Empowering Engineers with the Right Design Validation Toolsets

        by David Roccaforte on February 13, 2017

        If you read a few of my SOLIDWORKS Simulation tutorials and finite element analysis blogs you will notice the recurring “tool” theme. As an engineer and gearhead, I love anything that will help me do my job better, whether it’s extracting a broken bolt from a cylinder solidThinking-Empowering-Engineers-with-the-Right-Design-Validation-Toolsets-1head or determining the optimal amount of material to meet performance specifications. Show me a tool that can help me do it better and I’m listening.

        One of my fondest memories as an engineering intern was the day my manager approached me with a tool catalog. This was before online ordering when PO’s were still done by hand.

        He said, “Pick out what you think we need for the mechanical lab, and order two of everything.”  As a student with an internship being able to fill up the gas tank felt like a luxury. Now I get to order any tool we might need? I was in heaven.

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        • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

          SOLIDWORKS Simulation Tech Tip: Flow Solver Scalability

          by David Roccaforte on December 16, 2016

          Back in 2015, I tried an experiment comparing model size (number of cells) to memory needs and solve time. When I used SOLIDWORKS 2016, it was better at taking advantage of multiple cores as shown below. 

          flowsolverscalability

          The old solver started to lose advantages around 6 cores per job. You can see that the green curve is still upward sloping after 6 cores, that is the new solver.

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          • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

            Save a Life – Optimize that Design with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

            by Drew Buchanan on November 30, 2016

            The beads of sweat drip off my forehead as I drill my climbing anchor into the rock. I maneuver the rope through the anchor’s 9mm slot for the rope to fit through. After the rope is tucked through the anchor, I place the strap through my carabiner and secure it, then begin my climb upwards. As I move upwards my left foot slips on a piece of shale, and my hands lose their grip. I fall backward hoping my carabiner and anchor system holds. Thankfully, the carabiner’s suggested 9 KN engineering rating holds fine, and I fall only five feet instead of the 100 feet to the mountain floor.

            I realize many of you may not spend your free time hanging out on the side of a mountain 100 feet in the air on a small rock ledge—trusting that engineers adequately designed a four inch curved piece of metal to hold your weight. Regardless, we all rely on products we use daily that have been designed and optimized by engineers for our safety.

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            • POSTED IN CAD, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

              Save Time with SOLIDWORKS Simulation Feature: Blended Curvature-Based Mesh

              by Drew Buchanan on November 7, 2016

              Finite element modeling (FEM) continues to evolve and makes solving multiphysics problems easier and easier for users. No longer, are the days of dedicated engineers or programmers sitting in cubicles writing code to solve finite element problems. SOLIDWORKS Simulation has set the bar for making FEM easier for users while still being computationally powerful. In this blog, I will cover one of the newer capabilities in SOLIDWORKS Simulation that can save you a lot of time: the “Blended curvature-based mesh” feature.

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              • POSTED IN CAD, SOLIDWORKS TECH TIPS, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                The Right Tool for the Job Part 3: Getting Your Fix with Fixtures

                by David Roccaforte on September 20, 2016

                In the first blog in this series, I introduced SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard, our entry level but high value analysis package. In my second blog, I discussed the single body limitations in Sim Xpress and compared that with the extended capabilities in our more full featured tools. In this post, I will discuss the fixed constraint option in Sim Xpress and compare this to the capabilities of Simulation Standard.  

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                • POSTED IN CAD, SOLIDWORKS TECH TIPS, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                  The Right Tool for the Job Part 2: The Single Body Limitation in Sim Xpress

                  by David Roccaforte on September 8, 2016

                  In my last blog, I introduced SOLIDWORKS Simulation Standard and how it is a lot of analysis power for the money. One point that I made is that there are many times when SOLIDWORKS users might be trying to do too much with the free Xpress tools or might not realize what they are missing in a more complete solution like Simulation Standard Professional or Premium. In this blog, I will discuss the single body limitation imposed by Sim Xpress.

                  Sim Xpress allows only a single body and "fixed" constraints that stop motion on the chosen face in the X, Y, Z directions. The main reason for this limitation is that it prevents users from creating an unstable model by accident. Fix any face in X, Y, Z directions on a single body and you are going to have a stable model. In other words it's a slam dunk that the solver will able to solve for equilibrium and we can find a solution. This limitation guarantees a solution but limits the areas we can accurately extract stresses from and limits the types of situations we can accurately reproduce.

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                  • POSTED IN DATA MANAGEMENT, PDM, ELECTRICAL, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                    Join Us at a SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch Event Near You

                    by Christa Prokos on September 7, 2016

                    sw17cropWe are excited to announce that Fisher Unitech and our friends at Prism Engineering will be hosting a series of SOLIDWORKS 2017 launch events beginning next month on October 5th. With hundreds of new enhancements and features, the newest version of SOLIDWORKS promises to be the most powerful release yet.

                    So if you’re just as geeked out about SOLIDWORKS 2017 as we are you’ll fit right in! Join us at one of our live launch events to engage with our experts and gain some tips and tricks, along with a deeper understanding of how industry-specific tools can address your personal designing needs.

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                    • POSTED IN CAD, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                      Simulation Standard: The Right Tool for the Job

                      by David Roccaforte on August 23, 2016

                      As the SOLIDWORKS Simulation Product Specialist at Fisher Unitech, I generally blog about tips and tricks using our analysis tools. Today’s blog covers one of the biggest engineering crimes that I witness these days: Trying to make your engineering problem fit the tools that you have, rather than using the right tool for the job.

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                      • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                        Simulation Tech Tip: How can I simulate freezing water expansion?

                        by David Roccaforte on June 8, 2016

                        Now that spring is here ice is probably the last thing on your mind. Unless your designing a product where stress induced from freezing is a problem. One of my customers posed an interesting question.  How might we emulate freezing water in FEA ?

                         As you may know water expands when freezing and this can wreak havoc on any structure where water is contained or trapped.  Hence all the lovely pot holes in the spring punishing our fancy alloy wheels.

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                        • POSTED IN CAD, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                          More Video Opportunities to Learn Simulation and Analysis Fundamentals

                          by David Roccaforte on April 13, 2016

                          I just received an email from my analysis colleagues at SOLIDWORKS  kicking off a series of Simulation training videos.  This is one of the great things about SOLIDWORKS there are so many places to learn and this is a great team to learn from.

                          Check out the video series.

                           


                          • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                            30 Minutes to Smarter Design Decisions with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

                            by David Roccaforte on February 23, 2016
                            In the past 20 years, I have worked in manufacturing, product design and as a consultant/applications engineer for several simulation software companies. Working with many companies seeking to innovate and differentiate their products, I have seen personally that the decisions engineers make early in the design process often make the difference between success and failure of the products and the companies.

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                            • POSTED IN SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                              Flow Simulation Tech Tip: Hardware Benchmarks

                              by David Roccaforte on February 4, 2015

                              This past month I started a transition to new hardware which gave me a chance to compare four different machines side by side. Because I am commonly asked about what hardware is best for flow simulation, I though I would try a few benchmark experiments to see how different combinations of: Memory, CPU and Disk Speed affect solve times. I also wanted to get a feel for scaling by running with a different number of cores.

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                              • POSTED IN SOLIDWORKS TECH TIPS, SIMULATION, SOLIDWORKS

                                SOLIDWORKS FLOW SIMULATION: Animating Transient Flow Runs and Solver Iterations

                                by David Roccaforte on September 24, 2013

                                In this simulation tech tip, I am going to cover using animations to display the auto mesh refinement splitting cells, since it is useful for watching steady state flow solutions develop, as well as viewing multiple time steps in a transient solution.

                                1. Make sure we are saving the steps during the Flow solution. Open the "Calculation Control" dialog. This is accessible from the flow feature manager, command manager, and the solver menu window:

                                 

                                1a. Choose the saving tab and enter how often you want to save results.
                                1b. The individual iteration results will be saved in your Flow folder for each iteration as  "r_XXXX.fld"
                                These are individual result sets which will be referenced to create your animation. Be careful: this is a good way to fill up your hard drive for larger models with small times steps.CONTINUE READING:

                                2. Solve the flow model.

                                3. Load the results (last iteration is default) and create a plot that you want to animate, such as a cut plot or surface plot.

                                4. To begin creating the animation, either right click "Animation" in the feature manager and choose Insert or right-click the desired result set to animate such as a cut plot and choose Animation.

                                5. Once the animation pane appears, you will want to drag the study "control point" all the way until the start of the animation (to the left).

                                6. To bring the individual time frames/iteration in, you will then click the "Movie" icon.
                                6a. Enter the desired duration of the animation, and click "Next."
                                6b. Choose rotation or not; you can still rotate the model using control points and views later if you choose "no" here. The rotation will add key frames for a simple rotation about the global axis. Click "Next."
                                6c. Select "Scenario" to animate multiple timesteps. Click "Next."
                                6d. Choose "Uniform" or "Proportional" and select the start and finish from the sliders if you don't want to include all the timesteps/iterations results.

                                 

                                6e. Now you will see a "control point" for each iteration brought into the animation.
                                7.  To determine when the features are displayed in the timeline, you can insert and drag the "control points" for that feature.
                                7a.  To choreograph different plots, you can adjust "control points" for the individual features to begin and end at different times or overlap etc... (see the video we phase out the mesh cutplot then phase in the flow stream cutplot.)
                                7b. To change the view during the animation, you can place "control points" in the animation pane to move from one view to another. First, you must right click the project name and unselect "Lock Orientation." Each control point is a specific view orientation, and when they are connected, the model moves from one view to the next dynamically. To adjust the orientation at a "control point," drag the slider bar to the point and adjust the model view. (See the video below).
                                8. Now you can hit the play button and the view orientation will change based on your view "control points." In addition, your feature plots with "control points" will update based on the solver iterations. You can also save the animation as an .avi file by clicking the record button. This can be useful since the frames can take some time to load.
                                Watch the video below a couple times and you will see that it's a pretty quick process.

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